Matthew J. Eick

Professor

Education

Ph.D., Environmental Soil Chemistry, University of Delaware, 1995

M.S., Soil Chemistry, University of Delaware, 1989

B.S., Agronomy, Virginia Tech, 1987

Experience

2012 - Present - Professor of Environmental Soil Chemistry, Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech.

2002 - 2012 - Associate Professor of Environmental Soil Chemistry, Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech.

1997 - 2002 - Assistant Professor of Environmental Soil Chemistry, Crop and Soil Environmental Sciences, Virginia Tech.

1995 - 1997 - Assistant Professor of Environmental Soil Chemistry, Department of Agronomy, LSU.

 

Link to curriculum vita

Courses Taught

  • ENSC 1015/1016 - Foundations of Environmental Science
  • ENSC 1115/1116 - Foundations of Environmental Science Laboratory
  • ENSC/CSES/CHEM 4734 - Environmental Soil Chemistry
  • CSES 5634 - Soil Chemistry

Other Teaching and Advising

  • Advise the majority of the undergraduate environmental science students
  • Coordinating Counselor for the Undergraduate Environmental Science Program

Program Focus

As an inorganic environmental soil chemist my research deals with the reactions at the solid-solution interface that control the potential bioavailability of trace elements in the environment. This information is critical if we are to understand the mobility and toxicity of trace elements in the environment. Current research projects include the influence of organic and inorganic ligands on trace element sorption on mineral surfaces, silica polymerization on mineral surfaces, and the leaching of trace elements for coal combustion products and coal refuse.  

Role of Graduate Students

Both M.S. and Ph.D. students are actively involved in research projects in our laboratory. Students use a combination of advanced spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to probe the solid-solution interface to ascertain mechanisms involved with trace element sorption on soil constituent surfaces. Students work closely with their advisors in the laboratory to master important analytical techniques and skills. Additionally, collaboration with other students in the department and throughout the University provides the student with an excellent academic experience.

Future Research

Our research group will continue to use advanced analytical techniques to answer questions related to trace element bioavailability in natural and anthropogenic environments. In particular, advances in nanotechnology and the creation of nanoparticles will offer new environmental challenges in order to protect the environment and human health.

Dr. Matt Eick
  • (540) 231-8943
  • eick@vt.edu
  • 185 Ag Quad Lane
    236 Smyth Hall
    Blacksburg, VA
    24061
    USA